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Nicaraguense-
Junior
Studying Geography and Global Health
University of Washington, Seattle WA
Coffee <3
PURA VIDA!
389,517 notes
3 days ago - Reblog

dauntlesshadowhunterravenclaw:

TACO NEEDS TO KEEP HIS LITTLE MOUTH SHUT 

(Source: mykingdomforapen, via humoristics)

1 note
3 days ago - Reblog
surfnicawaves:

■♢TO A GREAT  FRIDAY NIGHT♧■
Nicaragua’ s Amazing Rum will be served daily during Cigar Vixen’ s  Rum and Cigar Safari coming up in November 11th - 17th.   ONLY 2 spots left.  #Nicaragua #Cigarsafari #Esteli Exclusive #cigargirls #cigaraficionado #cigarlife #Cigars #FlordeCana #Nica #Nicatravel #Bohemian #elegance #Cigarlover #Beachlife #allinclusive #secluded #buenavida #lifestylewww.Nica.Travel 800-679-1947

surfnicawaves:

■♢TO A GREAT FRIDAY NIGHT♧■
Nicaragua’ s Amazing Rum will be served daily during Cigar Vixen’ s Rum and Cigar Safari coming up in November 11th - 17th. ONLY 2 spots left. #Nicaragua #Cigarsafari #Esteli Exclusive #cigargirls #cigaraficionado #cigarlife #Cigars #FlordeCana #Nica #Nicatravel #Bohemian #elegance #Cigarlover #Beachlife #allinclusive #secluded #buenavida #lifestyle
www.Nica.Travel 800-679-1947

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4,600 notes
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(via the-absolute-best-gifs)

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(Source: serfborts, via fuckyeahqueenbeyonce)

393,360 notes
3 days ago - Reblog

enochliew:

Photographs by Thom Sheridan

In 1986, the United Way attempted to break the world record for balloon launches, by releasing 1.5 million balloons, which resulted in two deaths, millions in lawsuits, and a devastating environmental impact.

(Source: viralforest.com, via thefuuuucomics)

339 notes
5 days ago - Reblog
im-horngry:

Vegan Blueberry Muffins- As Requested!

im-horngry:

Vegan Blueberry Muffins- As Requested!

(via im-horngry)

148,256 notes
5 days ago - Reblog

ryantriple6:

-teesa-:

10.2.14

Sexism. Does it still exist?
Many men say no.

This was such a well done segment.

I highly suggest watching it.

(via thefuuuucomics)

194 notes
1 week ago - Reblog
nprglobalhealth:

Firestone Did What Governments Have Not: Stopped Ebola In Its Tracks
The classic slogan for Firestone tires was “where the rubber meets the road.”
When it comes to Ebola, the rubber met the road at the Firestone rubber plantation in Harbel, Liberia.
Harbel is a company town not far from the capital city of Monrovia. It was named in 1926 after the founder of the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, Harvey and his wife, Idabelle. Today, Firestone workers and their families make up a community of 80,000 people across the plantation.
Firestone detected its first Ebola case on March 30, when an employee’s wife arrived from northern Liberia. She’d been caring for a disease-stricken woman and was herself diagnosed with the disease. Since then Firestone has done a remarkable job of keeping the virus at bay. It built its own treatment center and set up a comprehensive response that’s managed to quickly stop transmission. Dr. Brendan Flannery, the head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s team in Liberia, has hailed Firestone’s efforts as resourceful, innovative and effective.
Currently the only Ebola cases on the sprawling, 185-square-mile plantation are in patients who come from neighboring towns.
Long rows of dappled rubber trees cover Harbel’s landscape. Prevailing winds cause the adult trees to lean westward. Back when Firestone was still based in Ohio, employees used to joke that the trees are “bowing to Akron.”
When the Ebola case was diagnosed, “we went in to crisis mode,” recalls Ed Garcia, the managing director of Firestone Liberia. He redirected his entire management structure toward Ebola.
Continue reading.
Photo: At Firestone’s plantation, workers gather at a shelter in the rubber tree forest, where buckets of sap are collected for processing.(John Poole/NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

Firestone Did What Governments Have Not: Stopped Ebola In Its Tracks

The classic slogan for Firestone tires was “where the rubber meets the road.”

When it comes to Ebola, the rubber met the road at the Firestone rubber plantation in Harbel, Liberia.

Harbel is a company town not far from the capital city of Monrovia. It was named in 1926 after the founder of the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, Harvey and his wife, Idabelle. Today, Firestone workers and their families make up a community of 80,000 people across the plantation.

Firestone detected its first Ebola case on March 30, when an employee’s wife arrived from northern Liberia. She’d been caring for a disease-stricken woman and was herself diagnosed with the disease. Since then Firestone has done a remarkable job of keeping the virus at bay. It built its own treatment center and set up a comprehensive response that’s managed to quickly stop transmission. Dr. Brendan Flannery, the head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s team in Liberia, has hailed Firestone’s efforts as resourceful, innovative and effective.

Currently the only Ebola cases on the sprawling, 185-square-mile plantation are in patients who come from neighboring towns.

Long rows of dappled rubber trees cover Harbel’s landscape. Prevailing winds cause the adult trees to lean westward. Back when Firestone was still based in Ohio, employees used to joke that the trees are “bowing to Akron.”

When the Ebola case was diagnosed, “we went in to crisis mode,” recalls Ed Garcia, the managing director of Firestone Liberia. He redirected his entire management structure toward Ebola.

Continue reading.

Photo: At Firestone’s plantation, workers gather at a shelter in the rubber tree forest, where buckets of sap are collected for processing.(John Poole/NPR)

(via pubhealth)